Round-up: Women Making Their Way in Engineering

 Debbie Sterling used her Stanford engineering degree to start GoldieBlox, a toy company that makes engineering toys with strong girl-related themes.

Debbie Sterling used her Stanford engineering degree to start GoldieBlox, a toy company that makes engineering toys with strong girl-related themes.

We’re starting a new blog feature this week: a round-up of engineering-related articles or events that have recently caught our eyes. A theme presented itself this week to do with women in engineering and technology. Even so, we’ll reserve the right to make future round-ups more eclectic.

Around the Women in Engineering World

The first set of items includes stories about women in engineering around the world, from India to Dubai to the best cities in the US for women in tech. Also, look for profiles of women doing great things in engineering, at the beginning, middle, and end of exciting careers.

Getting Women into the Field

 Girls learn engineering lessons at NCSU outreach fair. Photo courtesy of NC State College of Engineering, The Engineering Place.

Girls learn engineering lessons at NCSU outreach fair. Photo courtesy of NC State College of Engineering, The Engineering Place.

How to get girls interested in engineering is a challenge. Encouraging them to stay is even harder. Here are some stories about both these efforts, starting off upbeat with some outreach events and ending on a more sobering note with two studies analyzing what makes girls bail out.

You Really Need to Read This One

This last item might be the most thought-provoking. Vivek Wadhwa has pioneered new ways of analyzing and talking about the engineering and technology workforce, going back to his first studies of engineering graduates in China, India, and the United States.

Recently, he’s weighed in on gender issues. To his apparent regret. Here he describes why he has decided to retreat from the debate, to the loss of all interested in gender equity in engineering and technology.

Did any of these articles surprise you? Teach you something new? Share your responses in the comments below or send them directly to us.


 

Eric Iversen is VP for Learning and Communications at Start Engineering. He has written and spoken widely on engineering education in the K-12 arena. You can write to him about this topic, especially when he gets stuff wrong, at eiversen@start-engineering.com

You can also follow along on Twitter @StartEngNow.

And don’t forget to take a look at our popular K-12 engineering outreach books, Start Engineering, and Dream, Invent, Create.